The Flagship Case of Betty and Barney Hill

On September 19, 1961, a couple, Betty and Barney Hill were returning from a Canadian vacation to their home in New Hampshire. Barney worked for the postal service and Betty worked for the child welfare department.
 
Both were well educated and respected.
 
On the drive home that evening at about 10PM, Barney, who was driving, saw a star that seemed to be moving erratically. He told Betty about it and they watched as they drove along.
 
They were just north of North Woodstock when they noticed that the star was moving in an unusual manner. Barney looked through  his binoculars and saw that it was no star!! There were different colored lights and a row of windows around a flying craft. As the object grew closer, Barney could see people inside. The next thing they remember is hurrying back to the car and racing down the highway. Although they had only been driving for a few minutes, they discovered they were 35 miles down the road.
 
They finally arrived home safely. The next day Betty called her sister and told her about the strange object they had seen. Betty called Pease Airforce Base and Major Paul Henderson told her that indeed the object had been confirmed on their radar.
 
The Hills knew that they were not just seeing things. Soon after, Betty began having nightmares of her husband being forced into some kind of craft. Two writers heard of their story. With the aid of the writers, a time chart was made regarding the events of September 19. There were 2 hours of time that the Hills couldn't account for.
 
Because of the story the Hills were forced to hide from reporters. They decided to contact Benjamin Simon, a well known psychiatrist and neurologist.
 
Some of their memories through regression therapy revealed the car had stalled in the middle of the road. Alien beings had approached them and carried them to the UFO. Before they were released, the aliens had hypnotized them and ordered them to keep their capture a secret. They had been subjected to physical and mental experiments. Hair, skin and nail samples had been taken. Betty had also undergone gynecological testing and Barney revealed sperm samples were taken.
 
Two questions come to mind concerning this famous case. First, can anything really be concluded about the authenticity of the original incident? Second, have UFO organizations and the news media generally handled this case in a responsible fashion? While no final conclusions can be drawn (as in most UFO cases there is enough uncertainty and doubt to hide the Seventh Fleet), some very interesting insights about the UFO phenomenon can be gained by examining the Hill incident. The case would almost have to be labeled authentic if the hypnotic interrogation of the Hills had turned out to be based on true subconscious memories of real events. Also, the case would be very strong if the astronomical information revealed in Mrs. Hill's "star maps" was valid. And, of course, any corroborative testimony on the part of other possible witnesses would lend further credibility. Indeed, as reported in the books and magazines that cover the Hill case, all these criteria have been satisfied. But have they really been? Hypnotic regression (or abreaction) can be a useful tool in psychoanalysis and has been gaining wider acceptance as an interrogative technique in police investigations. Cooperative witnesses can recall details about an event they may have forgotten or may never actually have noticed consciously.
 
Regardless of whether or not the abduction claims were authentic, the strange case of Betty and Barney Hill is the still flagship case of alien abduction and still studied and talked about today.
 
Don't have an account yet? Register Now!

Sign in to your account